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Agastache (urticifolia)

Lee Riley
Horticulturist
USDA FS - Dorena Genetic Resource Center
34963 Shoreview Road
Cottage Grove, Oregon 97424
541-915-7324
541-767-5709 (fax)
leriley@fs.fed.us

Family Scientific Name: Lamiaceae
Family Common Name: Mint Family
Scientific Name: Agastache urticifolia
Common Name: Nettleleaf Horsemint, Nettleleaf Giant Hyssop
Species Code: AGUR
Ecotype: Lane County, Oregon
General Distribution: Western North America from Colorado, Wyoming and Montana west to BC and CA where mean annual precipitation ranges from 18-24 inches.
Propagation Goal: Plants
Propagation Method: Seed
ProductType: Container (plug)
Stock Type: 262 ml (16 in3) container
Time To Grow: 18 weeks
Target Specifications: Stock Type: Container seedling Root System: Firm plug in container.
Propagule Collection: Seed is collected in August when the inflorescence is dry and the seeds are hard. Small amounts are collected by shaking over a paper bag. Harvested seed is stored in paper bags at room temperature until cleaned.
Propagule Processing: Remove seed from plant material by hand with a screen. Then clean seeds using an air-screen cleaner with 1.40 mm top screen, a bottom screen, and light air. Store in cool-dry conditions.
Pre-Planting Treatments: Seeds are placed in a solution of 1000 mg/L GA3, soaked for 24 hours, rinsed, and soaked for an additional 6 hours in water. No stratification is necessary.
Growing Area Preparation/
Annual Practices for Perennial Crops:
Greenhouse growing facility.
Seeds are directly sown into containers. Seeds are lightly covered with nursery grit.
Growing medium used is 40:20:20:20 peat:composted fir bark:perlite:pumice with Nutricote controlled release fertilizer (18N:6P2O5:8K2O with minors; 180-d release rate at 21C) at the rate of 1.5 gram Nutricote per 262 ml container.
Seedlings remain in the greenhouse for 18 weeks, and are then moved to an outdoor growing area to induce dormancy.
Average growing season of nursery is from mid-March until early October.
Establishment Phase: Germination is fairly uniform and is usually complete in 2-3 weeks.
Length of Establishment Phase: 2 weeks
Active Growth Phase: Seedlings grow rapidly throughout the active growth phase. Following germination, plants are fertilized with soluble 12-2-14-6Ca-3Mg at 100 ppm for 2 weeks. During the growing season, fertilization depends on weather. Soluble 20-9-20 NPK, 20-18-18 NPK, or 17-5-24 NPK at a range of 100 to 150 ppm is applied weekly throughout the growing season. Flowering occurs within 3 months.
Length of Active Growth Phase: 10 to 12 weeks
Hardening Phase: No dry-down is done to induce dormancy. Seedlings are moved to an outdoor growing area in early-September.
Length of Hardening Phase: 2-3 weeks
Harvesting, Storage and Shipping: Harvest Date: Mid-October
Storage Conditions: Seedlings are usually outplanted in fall to early winter. No storage except in outdoor growing area. Plants are well irrigated prior to shipping and shipped in containers.
Other Comments: Wetland classification: facultative upland; usually occurs in non-wetlands, but may occur in wetlands.
References: [NRCS] USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service. Agastache urticifolia (Benth.) Kuntze nettleleaf giant hyssop. URL: https://plants.usda.gov/core/profile?symbol=AGUR (accessed 20 Sep 2018).

Hitchock CL, Cronquist A. 1973. Flora of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle (WA): University of Washington Press. 730 p.

Bonner FT, Karrfalt RB, Nisley RG, editors. 2008. The woody plant seed manual. Washington (DC): USDA Forest Service. Agriculture Handbook 727. 1223 p.

Dorena Genetic Resource Center Propagation Records, unpublished.

Citation:

Riley, Lee E.; Fisher, Leslie. 2018. Propagation protocol for production of Container (plug) Agastache urticifolia Plants 262 ml (16 in3) container; USDA FS - Dorena Genetic Resource Center Cottage Grove, Oregon. In: Native Plant Network. URL: http://NativePlantNetwork.org (accessed 2020/08/11). US Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, National Center for Reforestation, Nurseries, and Genetic Resources.





 
 
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